The well is traditionally the hub of the yard. Then the water pump came on. Water is necessary for drinking to the animals and washing and cooking. After the arrival of the water pipe, the importance of the well and pump disappeared, although there are still farms that pump up ‘their own water’. There are different types of pumps, namely a wooden pump and a metal (copper and cast iron).

Around the (copper) pump in the barn there was usually a brick wall, the so-called pump box. This pump box was sometimes used when it was big enough to cool the milk. The pump box could then be closed with a wooden stop so that water would remain in it. The crank pump pumped up the water from the groundwater. The check valve of the heart at the bottom of the pump had to close properly otherwise ‘ran off the pump’ if you just did not use it. As a last resort when using the pump, a bucket of water always had to be put ready for the next use. Water on the valve then caused some closure. The long crank had to be pulled back and forth. At each stroke a few liters of water came out of the pump. Under the spout of the pump there was often a small bucket with a long tube attached to it, the thickness of a rain pipe. That tube was often laid with the end in the feed trough for the cows. The first cow, which was closest to the pump, usually had such a thirst that in the beginning almost no water came to the second cow. Before the cow had also drank enough at the end of the queue, you were pumping for a while.

Nowadays we need water pumps for draining our garden. It is very useful to contact a water pump specialist. He can provide you with information about a garden irrigation pump.

https://www.waterpump.co.uk/

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